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THE STORY OF DATURA 

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It’s obscure aesthetic character is drawn from David Lynch’s American surrealistic cinema.
It is his style that inspired powerful photographs portraying the Western women’s oppressed sexuality in all it’s strength.

The repercussions of neither being seen nor respected, of women’s veiled pain in not being valued in this so-called men’s world, are beheld in a rather voyeuristic way.
With Datura, i am thoroughly questioning patriarchal expectations. Who is maintaining this phenomenon? Should we merely point out men, or are both sexes somehow, whether consciously or unconsciously, responsible for this unequally divided society of ours? Are these strong women actually as strong as they think they are, or do they keep reverting to ancient paradigms?

Set in a nightly d├ęcor, Datura shows sensual and lascivious women in a blistering intoxicating haze, a haze they thrive in as no other. These glamorous women, losing themselves in alcohol, sex, drugs and dangerous games in which they play a seductive and poisonous part.
Poisonous.
Exactly what Datura stands for: a fascinating poisonous flower, also known as hell’s bells or devil’s trumpets. Belonging to the witches’ weeds, this exceptionally hazardous drug, or a delirium in experienced hands for that matter, spreads its scent at night alone.

Exclusive as it is, limited edition prints are available for those who have seen the light in the darkness.

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DATURA CREATIVE Int.

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